Thursday, August 6, 2020

What to Do About Chipped Baby Teeth?

Children are naturally rambunctious with all their high-energy antics such as running, jumping, diving, or just biting down too hard on something. It goes without saying that a chipped baby tooth is a common experience during these early stages, especially a chipped front tooth.

If your child chips his or her tooth, don’t panic. Unless your child is in pain, a chipped baby tooth is usually nothing serious. Nevertheless, when a chipped tooth does occur, it’s wise to call the dentist and schedule an appointment. Because the sooner you deal with the problem, the better. After all, sometimes your child may not even realize what just happened, and there may be damage that you can’t see.

Chipped Baby Tooth Repair
There are many ways to deal with a chipped tooth and it’s worth reiterating that you should always see a dentist as soon as possible after the event, no matter how severe. A chipped tooth can cause pain and discomfort when chewing or when exposed to very hot or cold temperatures. Below is a list of methods on how best to deal with a chipped tooth.

  • Stay calm: Chipping a tooth is a common thing among children. When such an event happens, there’s no need for alarm. Also remember not to make your child feel self-conscious about their chipped tooth, even if it’s noticeable.
  • Check your child: You’ll want to check and see if your child is in pain or crying. Also check for blood.
  • Call the dentist: Remaining calm, explain what happened and follow any instructions your dentist may give you before scheduling an appointment.
  • Rinse / cold compress: Aside from calling the dentist, you’ll want to rinse your child’s mouth with cold water and apply a cold compress to reduce any potential swelling. You’ll also want to collect any teeth fragments from the scene of the accident and bring them to your dentist. In a case where you cannot find any teeth fragments and your child is having difficulty breathing, immediately take them to an emergency room to make sure they didn’t inhale any teeth fragments.
  • Pain relief: If your child continues to feel pain after the event, an advised amount of children’s ibuprofen is appropriate. If you are not sure, ask your dentist or doctor what the correct dosage before administering any medication.
  • Keep an eye on it: In some cases, the damage from the lost tooth will become visible later, such as a chipped baby tooth turning grey. Also make sure their gums do not become infected.

While it’s never fun when your child gets a chipped tooth, sometimes these things happen, and having a plan is essential in such an event.

The above article is from crest.com
Coloman E. Kondorossy, DMD, FAGD, DICOI   
Stephen K. Kondorossy, DMD, MBS  
General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com

Friday, July 24, 2020

Tooth Pain and Sensitivity Before or After Filling Cavities

If you have cavity symptoms, you may have pain in your teeth or in your gums. Cavity pain relief depends on the extent of your tooth decay. Regardless if your cavity symptoms are mild or severe, you should visit your dentist as you may need a filling.

Tooth Fillings for Cavity Pain Relief
Dental fillings are among the most common ways to relieve cavity pain. Here’s a basic overview of cavity pain relief with a dental filling:

  • Numbness: The first thing the dentist will do is numb the area of the cavity.
  • Cleaning: Once the area is numb, the dentist removes the decayed part of the tooth.
  • Filling: The final step in cavity pain relief—the dentist places a filling made from the material of your choice.

Causes of Tooth Pain After Fillings
Fillings are used to replace the decayed area of a tooth, reducing the pain associated with the cavity itself. But tooth pain after filling a tooth is not unusual. Some common reasons for tooth pain after a filling include:

  • Tooth sensitivity: A tooth that has just had a filling placed will be more sensitive to hot foods and cold foods, air temperature, and the pressure of biting. This type of tooth pain after filling a cavity should resolve within a few weeks. If not, contact your dentist.
  • Cracked or loose tooth fillings: Tooth pain after filling a cavity can occur if the filling is not fitting properly to the tooth, or if it develops cracks. If you suspect that your tooth pain is caused by a cracked or ill-fitting filling, contact your dentist.
  • Allergic reaction to tooth fillings: Some people have allergic reactions to the material used for their fillings, such as silver. To help avoid tooth pain after filling a cavity, be sure to tell your dentist about any allergies when discussing your filling choices.

Tooth Filling Pain Relief
You can reduce your risk of tooth pain after filling a cavity by avoiding common sensitive teeth triggers, including very hot or cold foods. In addition, toothpaste designed for sensitive teeth can help minimize the possible sensitivity and tooth pain after filling a cavity. Crest Gum and Sensitivity oral care products are formulated to help relieve the pain associated with sensitivity fast while offering additional protection against food and drinks that cause sensitivity.

If you have cavity symptoms, you may have pain in your teeth or in your gums. Cavity pain relief depends on the extent of your tooth decay. Regardless if your cavity symptoms are mild or severe, you should visit your dentist as you may need a filling.

When you have a dental procedure, you may experience sore teeth afterward. Sore teeth are common after many dental procedures, whether it is something as simple as a cavity filling or as complicated as gum surgery.

Sore Teeth After Filling
Whether you suffer from short-term sore teeth after receiving a filling or long-term sensitive teeth, it is important to follow a complete oral care routine. The Crest Pro-Health Sensitive Shield collection of products can help keep sore teeth clean and healthy, with a toothpaste designed to protect your sensitive teeth.


The above article is from crest.com
Coloman E. Kondorossy, DMD, FAGD, DICOI   
Stephen K. Kondorossy, DMD, MBS  
General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Dentures

Dentures are removable appliances that can replace missing teeth and help restore your smile. If you’ve lost all of your natural teeth, whether from gum disease, tooth decay or injury, replacing missing teeth will benefit your appearance and your health. That’s because dentures make it easier to eat and speak better than you could without teeth—things that people often take for granted.

When you lose all of your teeth, facial muscles can sag, making you look older. Dentures can help fill out the appearance of your face and profile. They can be made to closely resemble your natural teeth so that your appearance does not change much. Dentures may even improve the look of your smile.

Types of dentures:

  • Conventional. This full removable denture is made and placed in your mouth after the remaining teeth are removed and tissues have healed, which may take several months. 
  • Immediate. This removable denture is inserted on the same day that the remaining teeth are removed. Your dentist will take measurements and make models of your jaw during a preliminary visit. You don’t have to be without teeth during the healing period, but may need to have the denture relined or remade after your jaw has healed. 
  • Overdenture. Sometimes some of your teeth can be saved to preserve your jawbone and provide stability and support for the denture. An overdenture fits over a small number of remaining natural teeth after they have been prepared by your dentist. Implants can serve the same function, too. 

New dentures may feel awkward for a few weeks until you become accustomed to them. The dentures may feel loose while the muscles of your cheek and tongue learn to keep them in place. It is not unusual to experience minor irritation or soreness. You may find that saliva flow temporarily increases. As your mouth becomes accustomed to the dentures, these problems should go away. Follow-up appointments with the dentist are generally needed after a denture is inserted so the fit can be checked and adjusted. If any problem persists, particularly irritation or soreness, be sure to consult your dentist.

Even if you wear full dentures, you still have to practice good dental hygiene. Brush your gums, tongue and roof of your mouth every morning with a soft-bristled brush before you insert your dentures to stimulate circulation in your tissues and help remove plaque.

Like your teeth, your dentures should be brushed daily to remove food particles and plaque. Brushing also can help keep the teeth from staining. 

  • Rinse your dentures before brushing to remove any loose food or debris. 
  • Use a soft bristle toothbrush and a non-abrasive cleanser to gently brush all the surfaces of the dentures so they don't get scratched.
  • When brushing, clean your mouth thoroughly—including your gums, cheeks, roof of your mouth and tongue to remove any plaque. This can help reduce the risk of oral irritation and bad breath. 
  • When you’re not wearing your dentures, put them in a safe place covered in water to keep them from warping. 
  • Occasionally, denture wearers may use adhesives. Adhesives come in many forms: creams, powders, pads/wafers, strips or liquids. If you use one of these products, read the instructions, and use them exactly as directed. Your dentist can recommend appropriate cleansers and adhesives; look for products with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Products with the ADA Seal have been evaluated for safety and effectiveness.

If you have any questions about your dentures, or if they stop fitting well or become damaged, contact your dentist. Be sure to schedule regular dental checkups, too. The dentist will examine your mouth to see if your dentures continue to fit properly.

The above article is from mouthhealthy.org

Coloman E. Kondorossy, DMD, FAGD, DICOI   
Stephen K. Kondorossy, DMD, MBS  
General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com

Monday, July 6, 2020

Is Composite Resin Bonding Right For You?

Composite resin bonding can be a fast, minimally invasive and inexpensive option for the beautiful smile you're looking for. But knowing what makes you a good candidate can help you determine if it's the right investment for you.

What Is Composite Bonding?

Composite bonding is a cosmetic technique wherein a type of dental material – in this case, composite resin – is shaped and molded on your teeth to give the appearance of straighter, whiter smile. It can be used as a cosmetic solution to chipped teeth, gapped teeth and staining in both teeth and fillings. Unlike porcelain veneer placement, which can take more than two visits, composite resin bonding can be completed in one appointment.

According to Everyday Health, the cost for bonding can range from about $300 to $600 per tooth for a simpler procedure, like a cavity filling. Although many dental insurance plans do not cover cosmetic bonding, it's good practice to ask whether they will cover a portion – especially if it's part of a medically necessary procedure, which some insurers acknowledge.

Whom Is Composite Bonding Right For?

Composite resin bonding isn't for everyone. If your smile is crooked as the result of an over- or underbite, this treatment won't serve to correct it. Instead, speak with your dentist to determine if more in-depth work is needed like adjusting your bite or any complex chips or gaps in your teeth. Bonding is primarily for those who seek a cosmetic solution for teeth that are otherwise healthy.

What Can You Expect During Your Visit?

Composite bonding is a safe and effective technique that was developed more than 50 years ago, and has been widely available for over three decades, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). The fillings and processes today are very efficient, making it easier for both you and your dentist.

The treatment itself often starts with the removal of some surface enamel, allowing the dentist to best shape the composite resin to your tooth, followed by the application of the bonding agent. Your dentist will then add the composite resin, cure it with a special light and finish by polishing your teeth. Because the process involves a high level of technique for a natural mold and shape, it's best to work with a dentist who has experience and specialty in this area.

What Aftercare Is Needed?

With normal care, today's composite material is durable enough to last without regular attention; you won't need to seek out your dentist for special visits and upkeep. Nonetheless, make sure to keep your regular dental checkup and daily oral care a priority. Mouthwashes like Colgate Total® Gum Health, for instance, can improve gum strength by 45 percent for those who find their gumline tougher to maintain after bonding treatment. You should also avoid biting down on particularly hard foods, or ice, to prevent cracking.

If you're interested in achieving a brighter smile, composite resin bonding is a great option. Be sure to take care of your other oral necessities, first, to ensure your natural smile is healthy inside and out.

The above article is from colgate.com

Coloman E. Kondorossy, DMD, FAGD, DICOI   
Stephen K. Kondorossy, DMD, MBS  
General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

What Is Dental Public Health? A Look At How It Can Help

Below is an excerpt from an article found on colgate.com

Many oral diseases can be prevented with routine care and regular dental checkups. Unfortunately, not everyone is able to access adequate oral care. Dental public health programs work to rectify that. They provide assistance and programs so people can avoid the pain and discomfort poor oral health causes.

Recognized by the American Dental Association as a dental specialty since 1950, public dental programs focus on oral health issues within populations and communities rather than individuals. The goal is to assure optimal oral health among Americans through disease prevention and dental health promotion. Here are just a few examples of such programs that aim to improve the oral health of all Americans.

Dental Care for Students

Dental problems in kids can also affect a child's health and even his or her performance at school. In a study of 1,500 elementary to high school children from disadvantaged backgrounds in Los Angeles, California, 73 percent were found to have dental caries, says a study from the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry at the University of Southern California. The study found a correlation between these dental issues, lower grades and increased missed school days.

Dental sealants can reduce child tooth decay by more than 70 percent, estimates the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This is why several states have implemented school-based programs to provide sealants to children from low-income families who are at risk for cavities. Such programs identify a target market within a school district to meet the needs of children who are less likely to receive private dental care.

Dental Care for Seniors

Cost keeps many people away from the dentist, especially older adults. The problem: Avoiding preventive dental care will only lead to more extensive and expensive procedures later on. Furthermore, the severity of gum disease increases with age. As many as 23 percent of adults between the ages of 65 and 74 have severe gum disease, while people of all ages at the lowest socioeconomic level have the most severe gum disease, putting low-income seniors at risk, according to the CDC.

Medicare doesn't cover routine dental procedures and fewer than half of the states offer comprehensive dental benefits through Medicaid, leaving many seniors without necessary dental insurance. Some dental public health solutions include community outreach programs, like the Division of Geriatric Dentistry at Tufts University, which teaches the elderly about denture care and provides oral health and cancer screenings.

Dental Care for Expectant Moms

Dental care is especially important during pregnancy, but many women are unaware that oral health problems during this time can put both Mom and baby at risk. In a questionnaire provided to all maternity hospitals in the state of Iowa, 44 percent of women claimed they didn't visit a dentist during their pregnancy, reports the Iowa Department of Public Health. To help expectant moms stay informed and in charge of their overall health, the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families launched an app called Text4Baby, which educates mothers on their baby's development and baby care through their child's first year. It can also be used to set reminders for prenatal doctor and dentist visits, so that women can get the care they and their child need. Agencies on the federal, state and local level have partnered with this app to provide resources and information to expectant moms in their communities.

Preventive dental care, from using a quality toothbrush with extra soft bristles especially for sensitive gums like Colgate 360 Enamel Health Sensitive, to regular checkups, is vital for maintaining a healthy mouth and overall well-being. Dental public health programs can improve the lives of those who otherwise wouldn't have access to dental care, while increasing awareness of quality oral care for all.

To read the entire article visit colgate.com

Coloman E. Kondorossy, DMD, FAGD, DICOI   
Stephen K. Kondorossy, DMD, MBS  
General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com

Monday, June 15, 2020

What is Cosmetic Dentistry? Costs and Types

Below is an excerpt from an article found on crest.com

If your teeth are stained, discolored, worn, chipped, broken, misaligned, misshapen, or have gaps between them, modern cosmetic dentistry can give you a better smile. A “smile makeover” improves the appearance of your smile through one or more cosmetic dentistry procedures. Cosmetic dentists work with you to develop a treatment plan. Below you’ll find some information that can help you learn more about the various types of cosmetic dental procedures available.

Types of Cosmetic Dentistry

Teeth Whitening
Teeth whitening can be one of the simplest and least expensive ways to improve your smile. Teeth can be bleached with in-office products in your dentist’s office for about $500, or you can buy a mold and gels from your dentist to bleach your teeth at home. There are also whitening products available over the counter at retail stores for convenient at-home whitening: whitening toothpastes, rinses, and whitestrips. These products together run about $3 - $50.

Dental Veneers
Dental veneers are wafer-thin, custom-made shells of tooth-colored porcelain or resin that cover the front surface of the teeth. After removing about a half-millimeter of enamel from the tooth surface, these thin shells are bonded (cemented) to the front of the teeth, changing their color, shape, size, or length. Veneers are often called “Hollywood teeth." Living up to that name, this process can cost up to $500-$1,300 per tooth.

Dental Bonding
In dental bonding, a tooth-colored, putty-like resin, which is a durable plastic material, is applied to the tooth and hardened with an ultraviolet or laser light, bonding the material to the tooth. Your dentist then trims, shapes, and polishes it. Bonding can repair decayed, chipped, cracked, or misshapen teeth; it is also a good cosmetic alternative to, or replacement for, amalgam or silver fillings. Bonding takes about 30 to 60 minutes, and $100 to $400, per tooth.

Dental Crown
A dental crown, also called a cap, fits over and replaces the entire decayed or damaged tooth above the gum line, restoring its shape, size, strength, and appearance. Crowns keep a weak tooth from breaking or hold a cracked tooth together; they can be used cosmetically to cover misshapen or severely discolored teeth. Crowns can be made from metal, porcelain-fused-to-metal, resin, or ceramic, and cost about $500 to $900 each.

Inlays and Onlays
Inlays and onlays, also called indirect fillings, are made from gold, porcelain, or composite materials and fill decayed or damaged teeth. Dental fillings are molded into place during an office visit; however, inlays and onlays are created in a dental laboratory and bonded into place by your dentist. The filling is called an “inlay” when the material is bonded within the center of a tooth; it is called an “onlay” when the filling includes one or more points of the tooth or covers the biting surface. Inlays and onlays preserve as much healthy tooth as possible and are an alternative to crowns. This cosmetic dentistry procedure costs about $650 to $1,200 per tooth.

Dental Implants
Dental implants are titanium replacement tooth roots inserted into the bone socket of the missing tooth. As the jawbone heals, it grows around the implanted metal post, anchoring it securely in the jaw and providing a foundation for a replacement tooth. This procedure can cost anywhere from $1,250 to $3,000.

Other Options
A bridge is made of crowns for the teeth on either side of a gap with false teeth in between. A denture is a removable replacement for missing teeth. Dental braces can straighten crooked or misaligned teeth and works by applying continuous pressure over a period of time to slowly move teeth in a specific direction.

To read the entire article visit crest.com

Coloman E. Kondorossy, DMD, FAGD, DICOI   
Stephen K. Kondorossy, DMD, MBS  
General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com

Saturday, June 6, 2020

Scaling and Root Planing for Gum Disease

Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

Scaling and root planing is a deep cleaning below the gumline used to treat gum disease.

Why Do I Need It?
Gum disease is caused by a sticky film of bacteria called plaque. Plaque is always forming on your teeth, but if they aren’t cleaned well, the bacteria in plaque can cause your gums to become inflamed. When this happens, your gums will pull away from your teeth and form spaces called pockets. Plaque then gets trapped in these pockets and cannot be removed with regular brushing. If untreated, gum disease could lead to bone and tooth loss.

If gum disease is caught early and hasn’t damaged the structures below the gum line, a professional cleaning should do. If the pockets between your gums and teeth are too deep, however, scaling and root planing may be needed.

A July 2015 study in the Journal of the American Dental Association finds that scaling and root planing is beneficial to patients with chronic periodontitis (gum disease that has advanced past gingivitis). Chronic periodontitis affects 47.2% of adults over 30 in the United States.

What Happens During Scaling and Root Planing?
This deep cleaning has two parts. Scaling is when your dentist removes all the plaque and tartar (hardened plaque) above and below the gumline, making sure to clean all the way down to the bottom of the pocket. Your dentist will then begin root planing, smoothing out your teeth roots to help your gums reattach to your teeth. Scaling and root planing may take more than one visit to complete and may require a local anesthetic.

After Care Tips
After a deep cleaning, you may have pain for a day or two and teeth sensitivity for up to a week. Your gums also may be swollen, feel tender and bleed.

To prevent infection, control pain or help you heal, your dentist may prescribe a pill or mouth rinse. Your dentist may also insert medication (subantimicrobial-dose doxycycline) directly into the pocket that was cleaned.

Your dentist will schedule another visit to see how your gums have healed and measure the depth of your pockets. If they have gotten deeper, more treatment may be needed.

Good dental care at home is essential to help keep gum disease from becoming more serious or recurring.  Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft brush, clean between your teeth daily, eat a balanced diet, avoid using tobacco and see your dentist regularly.

To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org

Coloman E. Kondorossy, DMD, FAGD, DICOI   
Stephen K. Kondorossy, DMD, MBS  
General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com