Thursday, August 15, 2019

Teaching Teens Proper Oral Hygiene

When your teen is already busy with friends, schoolwork and catching up on sleep, proper oral hygiene can go on the back burner. When running late for school, sometimes there just isn't time for a full two minutes of toothbrushing. But as a parent, it's up to you to make sure that your teen practices good dental care. By making oral hygiene part of a simple daily routine, you can help your teen sneak in regular brushing and flossing along with all the other plans in his or her schedule.
Use Teen-Based Products
One of the reasons teens might be slacking in the dental care department is the fact that most oral hygiene products aren't exactly tailored to adolescent tastes. Strong flavors and boring designs could make teens less than enthused when it comes to daily care. That's where youth-geared products can really come in handy. By appealing to teens' tastes and style, it's easier to coax them into a daily care routine. Check out the Colgate®Fresh Confidence product line, designed with adolescents in mind.
Try Apps and Timers
One of the biggest issues for teens and proper oral hygiene is the fact that when they do brush, it might not be for a long enough period of time. Teens Health by the Nemours Foundation recommends that adolescents brush for two or three minutes; sometimes teens are lucky if they clock a meager 30 seconds. Therefore, using smartphone timer apps or even an egg timer can help teens become more aware of how long they should be brushing. Or, if your teen is never without his or her headphones, use a three-minute song as a guideline for brushing.
Limit Soda and Candy
Teens seem to be able to exist on a steady diet of soda, chips and candy, but those kinds of treats can wreak havoc on teeth. A diet high in sugar promotes bacteria and cavities. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that over 15 percent of children and teens between the ages of 6-19 have untreated cavities. By making healthier treats and drinks readily available, teens might be less likely to nosh on sugary foods. Keep bottled water, cut vegetables, whole-grain crackers and other sugar-free treats at the ready for convenient snacking.
Appeal to Confidence
Teens are notoriously concerned with their looks, so appealing to their image can be one way to encourage teens to brush up on their oral hygiene habits. Gently reminding teens that a slack dental care routine could result in yellow stains and bad breath can help remind them that the importance of toothbrushing is more than just staying cavity-free. If your teen is self-conscious about his or her smile, whitening toothpastes and mouthwashes can help improve confidence and contribute to a regular hygiene habit.
While teens might be perpetually time-crunched, skipping regular oral care to catch a few more minutes of sleep in the morning can have serious consequences. Making oral hygiene simple, quick and personalized may inspire your teen to brush regularly — and maybe even get to school on time.

To read the entire article visit colgate.com

Coloman E. Kondorossy, DMD, FAGD, DICOI   
Stephen K. Kondorossy, DMD, MBS  
General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com

Sunday, August 11, 2019

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 3 of 3)

Don’t replace fillings just because they’re old 












When you have a cavity, the dentist removes it and puts in a filling. These fillings can last for many years, but some people get silver fillings removed because they don’t like the color. However, the process of removing a filling can weaken the tooth. Additionally, insurance may not cover the removal. 

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.


General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com

Saturday, August 10, 2019

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 2 of 3)

Ask about all the options for calming your child during dental procedures 












Dental work can be scary for some kids. Talk with your dentist about ways to help your child stay calm. Tips for a successful dental visit can include making sure your child is not hungry before their dental appointment and scheduling an appointment at the proper time of day.

For jaw pain, try conservative treatments first 












Jaw pain can be caused by stress, arthritis or an injury. A treatment plan for jaw pain should first consist of actions like exercises and anti-inflammatory drugs.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.


General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   
SomersetImplantDental.com

Thursday, August 8, 2019

Choosing Wisely: 5 Things Every Family Should Know About Dental Health (Part 1 of 3)

Use toothpaste with fluoride for infants and children 












For children younger than 3 years, you should begin brushing a child’s teeth with fluoride toothpaste in an amount no larger than a grain of rice. For children 3 to 6 years of age, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.

Consider sealants to prevent decay or treat beginning cavities on the back teeth 












Dental sealants act as a barrier to prevent cavities. They are a plastic material applied by a dentist to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth where decay occurs most often.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.


General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   

Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay: Causes & Prevention

Even though they are temporary, your child's baby teeth are important, and are still susceptible to cavities. Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or Early Childhood Caries. Children need strong, healthy teeth to chew their food, speak and have a good-looking smile. Their first teeth also help make sure their adult teeth come in correctly. It’s important to start infants off with good oral care to help protect their teeth for decades to come. 

What Causes Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected.
There are many factors which can cause tooth decay. One common cause is the frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar. Tooth decay can occur when the baby is put to bed with a bottle, or when a bottle is used as a pacifier for a fussy baby. 
Tooth decay is a disease that can begin with cavity-causing bacteria being passed from the mother (or primary caregiver) to the infant. These bacteria are passed through the saliva. When the mother puts the baby’s feeding spoon in her mouth, or cleans a pacifier in her mouth, the bacteria can be passed to the baby. 
If your infant or toddler does not receive an adequate amount of fluoride, they may also have an increased risk for tooth decay. The good news is that decay is preventable. 

Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

  • Try not to share saliva with the baby through common use of feeding spoons or licking pacifiers. After each feeding, wipe your child’s gums with a clean, damp gauze pad or washcloth. 
  • When your child’s teeth come in, brush them gently with a child-size toothbrush and a smear (or grain of rice sized amount) of fluoride toothpaste until the age of 3. 
  • Brush the teeth with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste from the ages of 3 to 6.
  • Supervise brushing until your child can be counted on to spit and not swallow toothpaste—usually not before he or she is 6 or 7. 
  • Place only formula, milk or breast milk in bottles. Avoid filling the bottle with liquids such as sugar water, juice or soft drinks. 
  • Infants should finish their bedtime and nap time bottles before going to bed. 
  • If your child uses a pacifier, provide one that is clean—don’t dip it in sugar or honey. 
  • Encourage your child to drink from a cup by his/her first birthday. 
  • Encourage healthy eating habits. 

When your child’s first tooth appears, talk to your dentist about scheduling the first dental visit. Treat the first dental visit as you would a well-baby checkup with the child’s physician. Remember: starting early is the key to a lifetime of good dental health. For more information about nutrition and your baby, visit the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
To read the entire article visit mouthhealthy.org
Coloman E. Kondorossy, DMD, FAGD, DICOI   
General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   

Monday, August 5, 2019

What 10 Common Mouth Issues Really Look Like (Part 3 of 3)

You know good dental habits can help prevent things like cavities and gingivitis, but you may not know what conditions like these really look like or how they can affect your mouth. Use this visual guide to learn more about some of the most common dental health issues, symptoms to watch for and the potential treatments that are available. Please note: This content is for informational purposes only. Only a dentist, physician or other qualified health care professional can make a diagnosis.

Darkened Tooth








There are two reasons your tooth may change color after trauma: It’s either trying to protect the nerve or it’s dying. If it’s protecting the nerve, your tooth may look a little darker than the ones next to it. If it changes colors like a bruise (from pink to gray), this means your tooth is most likely dead. You may need a root canal, usually followed by a crown. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the tooth. If it is a baby tooth, you may be able to leave it alone until it falls out.

Canker Sores








Canker sores are small white or gray sores with a red border that appear your lips, the back of your throat or under your tongue. Their exact cause is uncertain but some suggest that immune system problems, bacteria or viruses may be play a role. They are also more common in women.

Canker sores aren’t contagious and usually heal on their own after one or two weeks. Over-the-counter creams and mouthwashes may give you temporary relief. Until it heals, stay away from hot, spicy or acidic foods because these can irritate the sore.

Cancer








Each year, approximately 40,000 new cases of oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue are diagnosed. Tobacco use, alcohol abuse and HPV all increase your chance of developing these cancers. Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer than women. During regular checkups, your dentist will check your mouth for symptoms like red or white patches, sores that won’t heal and rough, crusty spots. If anything suspicious is found, your dentist will order more testing or refer you to a specialist. The image above is only one example of how oral cancer might appear.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055   


Saturday, August 3, 2019

What 10 Common Mouth Issues Really Look Like (Part 2 of 3)

You know good dental habits can help prevent things like cavities and gingivitis, but you may not know what conditions like these really look like or how they can affect your mouth. Use this visual guide to learn more about some of the most common dental health issues, symptoms to watch for and the potential treatments that are available. Please note: This content is for informational purposes only. Only a dentist, physician or other qualified health care professional can make a diagnosis.

Gingivitis








Gingivitis is the earliest stage of gum disease, an infection of the tissues around your teeth caused by plaque. If you have gingivitis, your gums may become red, swollen and bleed easily. You may also experience bad breath. Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it.

You are more likely to develop gum disease if you skip brushing and flossing, use tobacco, have crooked teeth that are hard to keep clean, are pregnant, have diabetes or take certain medications. When in its early stages, the disease is still reversible and your gums can be returned to good health with a professional cleaning from your dentist, along with daily brushing and flossing.

Periodontitis








Periodontitis is the more advanced form of gum disease, a major cause of tooth loss in adults. According to the CDC, nearly half of U.S. adults suffer from it. The disease can be reversed in early stages, but damage may be permanent the longer it goes untreated. Although you may not be aware of the gum disease in your mouth, abscesses can develop which usually painful. Symptoms include bleeding, swollen gums, persistent bad breath or bad taste, loose permanent teeth and a change in bite. Your teeth may appear to become longer as gums and bone recede. There are many treatments available, including deep cleanings known as scaling and root planing. Talk to your dentist to find out what’s best for you.

Thrush








Thrush is a yeast infection that looks like white film in your mouth. You’re more likely to get thrush if you have an illness that affects your immune system. This includes people with HIV/AIDS or cancer, as well as people using steroids to manage their asthma. People with untreated or uncontrolled diabetes are also susceptible because sugar in saliva encourages yeast to grow. Thrush is also common in people who wear dentures. If you have symptoms, see your dentist. After a scraping to confirm you have thrush, your dentist can prescribe medicine to clear it up.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

General Dentists  
1445 Hamilton Street  
Somerset, NJ 08873   
(732) 249-0055